Writer-speak

coffee-bookLast week I had coffee with a friend I met at a writers conference and I had the best time. It wasn’t just our common interests, our common faith, or the fact that she’s really cool that made it great. It was our ability to communicate in Writer-speak.

I complained about the head hopping in the novel I’m reading, shared my hope that I’m adequately using deep POV in the novel I’m writing, and bemoaned platform building and she UNDERSTOOD. I didn’t have to explain the terms, didn’t have to explain the publishing process or my writerly struggles. Together we celebrated our seemingly-insignificant-to-the-outside-world-but-huge-for-a-writer-little-daily-victories we’d had.

I encourage you to find a writer friend (or friends) if you haven’t already. Conferences are great places to meet like-minded writers. They will share your passion for writing, they will “get you”, and they will encourage you in a way only a fellow writer speaking Writer-speak can.

 

So Boaz said, “Come aside, friend, sit down here.” So he came aside and sat down. Ruth 4:1b

Image courtesy of The Coffee Book Tag

 

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Pre-Conference Jitters: “A Mountain Top Experience Accessible to All”

Monday Morning Music Ministry is a great blog run by Rick Marschall. In this week’s post, guest writer Barbara Haley talks about how she felt leading up to her first writers conference and the near panic that set in. conference goalsOh, how well I know that feeling! She also shares the conversation with her husband that brought her peace in regards to the conference and her writing. It was a real encouragement to me, and I hope you read it and it blesses you as well! (It applies to writers and non-writers; to anyone who is trying to serve God and sometimes gets overwhelmed or discouraged.)

What I Learned at a Writers Conference

Two weeks ago I attended a local(ish) writers conference. It was like entering an embassy while traveling abroad: everyone there spoke my language! POV, protagonist, proposal, pitch, platform, even Peter Piper. It was wonderful. Here are four things I learned that weekend.write his answer

  1. Bring a friend or make a friend. I’ve been to a writers conference twice by myself, but this time a friend came with me. SO fabulous! Apart from being able to share the fun and bounce ideas off of each other, having a friend gave me one unexpected advantage: confidence. We’re chatting, we’re laughing, and hey, there’s SuchAndSuch author, editor, web designer. Why don’t we go say hello? The conversation is already flowing between you, so it feels much more natural to approach the industry people you’d love to converse with.
  2. 250 business cards is a LOT of cards and handing out the first two will immediately show you the flaw in all of them. In my case, font size. I didn’t realize how small the font was until everyone I gave a card to held it at arm’s length and squinted at it through reading glasses. There’s a reason the standard font size on submissions is 12, not 10.
  3. Don’t burn your bridges when you don’t get the answer you were hoping for from an editor, agent, etc. I didn’t do this, but I had the urge and restrained myself. This year in particular I noticed how interconnected the publishing industry is. Editor A works for Publisher A, but is also an author represented by Agent B, who also represents Author C who is good friends with Editor D from Publisher D. They all know each other and your reputation can follow you – good or bad – around their circles.
  4. Talk with everyone. You will receive your best writing tips and make your best connections when you least expect it.

My last piece of advice is this: if you want to write, go to a writers conference! The experience you gain is invaluable.